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Each of these methods for gardening is equally impressive and successful. Furthermore, the amount of work that goes into gardening in raised beds, containers, or the ground, is practically the same.

That’s why the answer to whether raised beds, containers, or the ground, is better for gardening, depends on several various factors.

Gardening in the Ground

A toddler walks between rows of strawberry plants growing directly in the ground.

If you’re gardening a mono-crop (a single species of plant), the ground is the easiest and surest route. The same goes for growing rows and mounds of vegetables.

However, In the case that your soil is of very poor quality, you may want to consider installing raised beds with compost over the top of the actual ground itself.

Gardening in Raised Beds

A young girl takes a picture of flowers growing in a raised bed.

Speaking of raised beds, if you are particularly interested in designing an aesthetically pleasing and easy-to-maintain garden, building raised beds is a sure-fire way to get it done.

Furthermore, for those of advanced age, or with physical disabilities, raised beds make gardening much easier.

Gardening in Containers

Green herbs of three different varities growing in orange colored containers.

If space is tight, containers are an excellent alternative to raised beds.

The biggest advantage that container gardening has over raised beds and ground/soil gardening, is the fact that plants in containers can be moved inside during storms or cold weather.

Containers can also be placed on raised platforms to be even higher off the ground (great for those with bad backs) and easier to reach.

Another significant plus to containers is that they can be placed inside terraces and porches as well as on balconies, windowsills, and patios.

Which is Right for Your Garden? The Ground, Containers, or Raised Beds?

Both containers and raised beds are easier to maintain high-quality soil. There is also little to no soil erosion to worry about (and fewer bugs) with either of the two methods. 

The ground, on the other hand, is free, traditional, and is more than capable of growing just about any species of plant (given the right circumstances).

Suggested Reading: WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MULCH AND COMPOST?

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